DIY Cinema

Practical Hacks for the amateur and independent filmmaker.

No Film School: The Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera Is Now $500 Cheaper (This Summer Only)
Of the myriad cinema-style cameras that have hit the market over the past year, none are as inexpensive or have as tiny of a form-factor as the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera. Add to that the camera’s 13 stops of dynamic range and internal ProRes/CinemaDNG recording, and it seems like one hell of a bargain at $995. As most of you know, Blackmagic has a distinct history of reducing prices on their cinema cameras, and they’ve done it once again — at least for the time being — with the BMPCC. For the next month and a half, you’ll be able to snag one of these little cameras for only $495.
First, here’s a brief snippet from the Blackmagic Design press release that explains the price drop, and for how long you’ll be able take advantage of the new price.

Blackmagic Design today announced an exciting Summer Special discount for the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera for the low price of US$495. With a normal recommended retail price of US$995, this Summer Special represents incredible value and is available for a limited time and will end on the 31st of August 2014. This Summer Special price is subject to limited availability, after which the price will return to the usual recommended retail price of US$995.

Ultimately, this is an absolutely tremendous deal for a camera with an impressive feature set. Even though the BMPCC was already the most affordable way to get into professional video codecs like ProRes and RAW, it’s now so mind-blowingly inexpensive that now would be the perfect time to invest in one as a B-cam or crash cam for larger projects or as something small for when you’re traveling.
You can take advantage of the new pricing at any of the Blackmagic resellers like B&H.
Links:
Blackmagic Design Announces Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera for US$495 – Blackmagic Design Press Releases
Blackmagic Design Pocket Cinema Camera — B&H

No Film School: The Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera Is Now $500 Cheaper (This Summer Only)

Of the myriad cinema-style cameras that have hit the market over the past year, none are as inexpensive or have as tiny of a form-factor as the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera. Add to that the camera’s 13 stops of dynamic range and internal ProRes/CinemaDNG recording, and it seems like one hell of a bargain at $995. As most of you know, Blackmagic has a distinct history of reducing prices on their cinema cameras, and they’ve done it once again — at least for the time being — with the BMPCC. For the next month and a half, you’ll be able to snag one of these little cameras for only $495.

First, here’s a brief snippet from the Blackmagic Design press release that explains the price drop, and for how long you’ll be able take advantage of the new price.

Blackmagic Design today announced an exciting Summer Special discount for the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera for the low price of US$495. With a normal recommended retail price of US$995, this Summer Special represents incredible value and is available for a limited time and will end on the 31st of August 2014. This Summer Special price is subject to limited availability, after which the price will return to the usual recommended retail price of US$995.

Ultimately, this is an absolutely tremendous deal for a camera with an impressive feature set. Even though the BMPCC was already the most affordable way to get into professional video codecs like ProRes and RAW, it’s now so mind-blowingly inexpensive that now would be the perfect time to invest in one as a B-cam or crash cam for larger projects or as something small for when you’re traveling.

You can take advantage of the new pricing at any of the Blackmagic resellers like B&H.

Links:

Let’s Talk About Movies:

MENTAL ILLNESS PORTRAYED ON SCREEN
What makes it so appealing to the audience?

"For actors, it’s a cinematic gift, a chance to play a characteristic as well as a character. For directors, it’s a chance to explore the psyche in visual and narrative detail. For audiences, it’s a window into a world they will (hopefully) never experience. When combined in the just the right way, without histrionics or spectacle, the results can be incredible." - Source

(via quienesesachica)

Why filmmakers may return to old-school special effects

The focus on eyes emphasises the overall desperation for secrets and trust that characterises both the FBI and the criminals. On close ups, having Jodie Foster look slightly off camera and all the other actors straight on, subtly highlights the fact that most of the film is from Clarice’s point of view and that others struggle to know her intimately. When she finally confides in Lecter and tells him about her childhood and the lambs, she looks straight into the camera for one of the first times [x]

(Source: kissthefuture, via adsertoris)

(Source: filmsteria, via quienesesachica)

oldfilmsflicker:

Great Directors, 2009 (dir. Angela Ismailos)

(via adsertoris)

womenofkwmc:

Kathryn Bigelow, director of The Hurt Locker, is the only woman EVER to win a Best Director Oscar. Only 4 women have ever been nominated. Women made up only 6% of Directors for the top movies of 2013. There were NO female nominees for directing, cinematography, film editing, writing (original screenplay), or music (original score) during last year’s Academy Awards.

womenofkwmc:

Kathryn Bigelow, director of The Hurt Locker, is the only woman EVER to win a Best Director Oscar. Only women have ever been nominated. Women made up only 6% of Directors for the top movies of 2013. There were NO female nominees for directing, cinematography, film editing, writing (original screenplay), or music (original score) during last year’s Academy Awards.

(via dazedandchinese)

Life after Pi is a short documentary about Rhythm & Hues Studios, the L.A. based Visual Effects company that won an Academy Award for its groundbreaking work on “Life of Pi” — just two weeks after declaring bankruptcy. The film explores rapidly changing forces impacting the global VFX community and the Film Industry as a whole.

DIRECTED/EDITED BY: Scott Leberecht
PRODUCED BY: Christina Lee Storm

mitaimon:

GoProとIKEAキッチンタイマーの素敵な関係 GoPro timelapse DIY setting (by shiotsuki acercreation)

GoProもIKEAもすごいな

How to make a rotating timelapse stand for your GoPro with an Ikea kitchen timer.

(via pedalfar)