DIY Cinema

Practical Hacks for the amateur and independent filmmaker.

The focus on eyes emphasises the overall desperation for secrets and trust that characterises both the FBI and the criminals. On close ups, having Jodie Foster look slightly off camera and all the other actors straight on, subtly highlights the fact that most of the film is from Clarice’s point of view and that others struggle to know her intimately. When she finally confides in Lecter and tells him about her childhood and the lambs, she looks straight into the camera for one of the first times [x]

(Source: kissthefuture, via adsertoris)

(Source: filmsteria, via quienesesachica)

oldfilmsflicker:

Great Directors, 2009 (dir. Angela Ismailos)

(via adsertoris)

womenofkwmc:

Kathryn Bigelow, director of The Hurt Locker, is the only woman EVER to win a Best Director Oscar. Only 4 women have ever been nominated. Women made up only 6% of Directors for the top movies of 2013. There were NO female nominees for directing, cinematography, film editing, writing (original screenplay), or music (original score) during last year’s Academy Awards.

womenofkwmc:

Kathryn Bigelow, director of The Hurt Locker, is the only woman EVER to win a Best Director Oscar. Only women have ever been nominated. Women made up only 6% of Directors for the top movies of 2013. There were NO female nominees for directing, cinematography, film editing, writing (original screenplay), or music (original score) during last year’s Academy Awards.

(via dazedandchinese)

Life after Pi is a short documentary about Rhythm & Hues Studios, the L.A. based Visual Effects company that won an Academy Award for its groundbreaking work on “Life of Pi” — just two weeks after declaring bankruptcy. The film explores rapidly changing forces impacting the global VFX community and the Film Industry as a whole.

DIRECTED/EDITED BY: Scott Leberecht
PRODUCED BY: Christina Lee Storm

mitaimon:

GoProとIKEAキッチンタイマーの素敵な関係 GoPro timelapse DIY setting (by shiotsuki acercreation)

GoProもIKEAもすごいな

How to make a rotating timelapse stand for your GoPro with an Ikea kitchen timer.

(via pedalfar)

oldhollywood:

Days of Heaven (1978, dir. Terrence Malick)
"At Malick’s insistence certain parts of the film were made at what he calls the ‘magic hour’, that is, the time between sunset and nightfall. From the point of view of luminosity, this period lasts about twenty minutes, so that calling it a ‘magic hour’ is an optimistic euphemism. 
The light really was very beautiful, but we had little time to film scenes of long duration. All day we would work to get the actors and the camera ready; as soon as the sun had set we had to shoot quickly, not losing a moment. For these few minutes the light is truly magical, because no one knows where it is coming from. The sun is not to be seen, but the sky can be bright, and the blue of the atmosphere undergoes strange mutations.
 Malick’s intuition and daring probably made these scenes the most interesting ones visually in the film. And it takes daring to convince the Hollywood old guard that the shooting day should last only twenty minutes. Even though we took advantage of this short space of time with a kind of frenzy, we often had to finish the scene the next day at the same time, because night would fall inexorably. Each day, like Joshua in the Bible, Malick wanted to stop the sun in its imperturbable course so as to go on shooting.” 
-excerpted from A Man with a Camera, the autobiography of Days of Heaven cinematographer Néstor Almendros

oldhollywood:

Days of Heaven (1978, dir. Terrence Malick)

"At Malick’s insistence certain parts of the film were made at what he calls the ‘magic hour’, that is, the time between sunset and nightfall. From the point of view of luminosity, this period lasts about twenty minutes, so that calling it a ‘magic hour’ is an optimistic euphemism.

The light really was very beautiful, but we had little time to film scenes of long duration. All day we would work to get the actors and the camera ready; as soon as the sun had set we had to shoot quickly, not losing a moment. For these few minutes the light is truly magical, because no one knows where it is coming from. The sun is not to be seen, but the sky can be bright, and the blue of the atmosphere undergoes strange mutations.

Malick’s intuition and daring probably made these scenes the most interesting ones visually in the film. And it takes daring to convince the Hollywood old guard that the shooting day should last only twenty minutes. Even though we took advantage of this short space of time with a kind of frenzy, we often had to finish the scene the next day at the same time, because night would fall inexorably. Each day, like Joshua in the Bible, Malick wanted to stop the sun in its imperturbable course so as to go on shooting.” 

-excerpted from A Man with a Camera, the autobiography of Days of Heaven cinematographer Néstor Almendros

(via cheermeupthankyou)

micropolisnyc:

policymic:

Sorry young women, the Oscars don’t represent you

An LA Times study found that Academy Award voters are 94% Caucasian, 77% male and have a median age of 62. Men make up 90% of five branches from cinematography to writing, and of the 43 board governors, only six are women. It makes me wonder, if more young people were members of the Academy, might the Oscar nominations change?
Read more

Follow policymic on Tumblr


but we all already knew the academy awards were a farce

micropolisnyc:

policymic:

Sorry young women, the Oscars don’t represent you

An LA Times study found that Academy Award voters are 94% Caucasian, 77% male and have a median age of 62. Men make up 90% of five branches from cinematography to writing, and of the 43 board governors, only six are women. It makes me wonder, if more young people were members of the Academy, might the Oscar nominations change?

Read more

Follow policymic on Tumblr

but we all already knew the academy awards were a farce

(via cheermeupthankyou)

Why Hollywood Will Never Look the Same Again on Film: LEDs Hit the Streets of LA & NY « No Film School

After Michael Mann set out to direct Collateral, the story’s setting moved from New York to Los Angeles. This decision was in part motivated by the unique visual presence of the city — especially the way it looked at night. Mann shot a majority of the film in HD (this was 2004), feeling the format better captured the city’s night lighting. Even the film’s protagonist taxi needed a custom coat to pick up different sheens depending on the type of artificial lighting the cab passed beneath. That city, at least as it appears in Collateral and countless other films, will never be the same again. L.A. has made a vast change-over to LED street lights, with New York City not far behind. Read on for why Hollywood will never look the same again — on film or otherwise.

click link for full story

newyorker:

More than ninety per cent of cinema screens in the U.S. have converted from film to digital projectors. What does the costly conversion mean for independent theaters? In this video, industry professionals weigh in: http://nyr.kr/JK3ItX

(Source: newyorker.com, via kit1232)